Entries in category “Web standards”

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Extended media thoughts

The first weekend of this month, for me, was spent in sunny Santa Clara, attending the 2013 Mozilla Summit. Overall, it was a great weekend, getting to reconnect with old friends, make some new ones and see and talk about a lot of cool technology and plans for the future of Mozilla. Like most people (or so I suspect), I’m not normally a huge fan of company get-togethers, but Mozilla is different from normal in a lot of important ways. The Summit wasn’t just a gathering of Mozilla ...

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In pace requiescat

So the charter of the XHTML Working Group will be allowed to expire without renewal. This is a source of consternation for some, who feel that the W3C is perhaps sending conflicting messages — how long until we find out that HTML5 isn’t really the future, either? — and, perhaps, smug “I told you so” satisfaction for others.

I have little to add to either of those camps, so what follows here is nothing more than my rambling, disconnected thoughts on the news.

XHTML had it coming

In a way ...

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Microformats and such

I hope you’ll forgive this brief diversion from my ongoing attempt to distinguish web developers from web designers, but it’s late, I’ve had a couple beers and I’ve been tinkering a bit with some code. Regularly-scheduled programming will return shortly.

So. The microformats people and the accessibility people are at war with each other, or so it seems (remember to read that article with tongue firmly in cheek). The cause of this tempest in a teapot is a simple enough question: how do you embed both ...

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Things I have learned about XHTML

The following are gleaned from the comments to my recent explanation of why I chose to use HTML 4.01 Strict for my redesign, rather than a flavor of XHTML, an explanation in which I mostly boiled the debate — for my needs, here on this site — down to “XHTML doesn’t offer me any compelling advantage, and it’s more complex to do right than most people know/admit”.

Advance warning: yes, this is snarky and is going to make fun of uninformed comments. Yes, I do think it’s ...

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Why HTML

So, as I let the dust settle from the most controversial changes I made in the redesign (and tweak some things and watch my stats in response to the constructive feedback I’ve gotten), I’d like to address the other big change that people have been asking about: why I switched (switched back, actually) from XHTML 1.0 to HTML 4.01.

The short and sweet reason is simply this: XHTML offers no compelling advantage — to me — over HTML, but even if it did it would also offer increased ...

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Victory for the web

Standards” means “standards”. Thank you for listening.

Now. Anybody out there who’s relying on version-specific quirks, get off your ass and fix your sites. It’s 2008, for crying out loud.

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X-UA-8-Ball

Once again, with apologies to John Gruber…

Q: Do standards-based developers have to use X-UA-Compatible if they care about progressive enhancement for future browsers?

A: As I see it, yes.

Q: Doesn’t Internet Explorer already offer a fine-grained way to target specific versions?

A: Yes, definitely.

Q: So if there was a problem with the IE6 to IE7 transition, doesn’t that mean people weren’t properly using an existing tool which could have future-proofed their sites?

A: You may rely on it.

Q: Given that, is it likely ...

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X-No-Really

It’s sad to reach the point where “epic fail” is the most apt term I can come up with to describe an article by Zeldman, but that’s where I am today. His article “Version Targeting: Threat or Menace?” in today’s ALA is so far off the mark that, honestly, I can’t come up with any other description.

No, Microsoft is not relevant anymore.

No, the default behavior is not correct.

No, the switch does not solve the problems the IE team claims to be fighting.

No ...

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X-No-Thanks

Last week I spent some time dissecting what, I believe, is the reason behind the announcement that Windows Internet Explorer (née “Microsoft Internet Explorer”) will, as of version 8, include the ability to emulate previous versions of its rendering engine and, in addition, will default to emulating IE 7 when no version is specified (with the exception of HTML 5, which reputedly will trigger a genuine “standards mode” in IE 8).

At the time, I was only concerned with analyzing why Microsoft has chosen this route; I was mostly ...

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Legacy.

For centuries Galactic civilization has stagnated and declined, though only a few ever realized that. But now, at last, the Periphery is breaking away and the political unity of the Empire is shattered. Somewhere in the fifty years just past is where the historians of the future will place an arbitrary line and say: “This marks the Fall of the Galactic Empire.”

— Isaac Asimov, Foundation

Amid clamor in the world of finance, the world of Web technology today is experiencing its own crash, of a sort. The unexpected announcement today ...

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The future of web standards

The world of standards-based web design and development has been undergoing something of a shake-up these past few days; Andy Clarke’s CSS Unworking Group” seems to have opened the floodgates to expressions of dissatisfaction with the current method of progress (or lack thereof) in developing and standardizing new features for web developers and designers. Alex Russell’s “The W3C Cannot Save Us” and my friend and former colleague Jeff Croft’s “Do we need a return to the browser wars?” continue the theme, as does Stuart Langridge’s “Reigniting ...

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A chronicle of the Ages of the Web

Sometime pretty soon (in fact, in the very next thing I write), I’m going to need some consistent way to refer to different periods in the history of the Web. I don’t know of any widely-accepted chronology for this, and I especially don’t know of any which really fits with the sort of references I’m going to need to make, so, with apologies to J.R.R. Tolkien, I present my own chronicle, derived from one too many nights of having re-read The Lord of the ...

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Be liberal in your HTTP Accept…

Ever since I started using Joe Gregorio’s mimeparse module to help with my OpenID delegation, I’ve been treated to a first-hand tour of the various things people have thought it would be good to stuff into the HTTP Accept headers their applications send. So, naturally, I’m going to start a gallery of some of my favorites.

So far the winner in the “is that really what you meant” category is what appears to be the default header sent by Java’s HTTP connection classes:

text/html, image ...

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