Entries in category “JavaScript”

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The JavaScript knowledge gap

JavaScript is a paradox of a language. It has nearly universal availability in its target market — client-side Web scripting — and is a major component of “Web 2.0”, but very few people actually write or even really know JavaScript. Many “modern” web-development frameworks remove the need for that by offering direct translation from some other language to JS, or by offering “helpers” which generate and include JavaScript automatically. And even among the few folks who don’t use those tools, most prefer to work entirely within the confines of a ...

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Choosing a JavaScript library

Previously we looked at some objections to JavaScript libraries and some possible responses. Now it’s time to ask a bigger question: do you need a JavaScript library, and if so how should you go about choosing one? I’m not going to recommend any particular library, because I don’t think there’s such a thing as one-size-fits-all in web development, but I can list a few things which are useful to keep in mind when making these decisions. So let’s dive in.

Do you need a library ...

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Let’s talk about JavaScript libraries

JavaScript’s got a bad rap; it’s the language everybody loves to hate, and the one language which, more than any other in the modern web developer’s toolbox, people will go to insane lengths to avoid writing directly (witness Google Web Toolkit, JavaScript “helpers” in server-side frameworks, etc.). Which isn’t fair, really, because (as I’ve said many a time) most people don’t actually hate JavaScript the language; they hate the buggy and inconsistent implementations of JavaScript in major web browsers and, to a larger extent ...

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I can’t believe it’s not XML!

As you may or may not have heard, JSON came to Dave Winer’s attention today. He is, quite obviously, of the opinion that this is just a reinvention of what people are already doing just fine with XML, thank you very much, so what’s the point?

Of course, this ignores the fact that the Lisp folks have been making the same argument for years, wondering why there was this great pressing need to go out and invent XML when s-expressions were just dandy.

But once you get past ...

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Sniffle

The other day, the Dojo blog announced the public beta of Renkoo, an “evite killer” which relies heavily on the asynchronous features of Dojo and “Comet”, the name that’s been given to the use of long-lived HTTP connections to provide instant updates of state in event-driven web applications.

Except I can’t check out Renkoo in my browser of choice — Safari — because I get automatically redirected to their “unsupported browser” page. They have a brief write-up on their blog of why Safari support is problematic, though I can’t ...

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The functional language that’s right under your nose

Recently I’ve been getting an itch to learn a functional programming language. I’ve made a couple attempts on Lisp over the years, with mixed results; I can write fairly basic Common Lisp, and hack on Emacs a bit, but I’ve never advanced much beyond that. I’d been looking at some of the trendy, popular functional languages (well, popular among certain circles) like Haskell, OCaml and Erlang, when I remembered that I already knew a functional language. In fact, part of the reason why I was hired ...

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Django tips: A simple AJAX example, part 2

Last time around we looked at how to write a simple view which processes a form and either returns errors or returns success, and then tweaked it slightly so that the same view could handle either a “regular” form submission (in which case it operates normally), or an XMLHttpRequest (in which case it returns JSON).

Today we’ll look at writing the JavaScript side of it; for reference, here’s the live example we’re going to build. This will be a fairly long write-up, but that’s not an ...

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Django tips: A simple AJAX example, part 1

One thing that’s come up over and over again in the Django IRC channel and on the mailing lists is the need for good examples of “how to do AJAX with Django”. Now, one of my goals in life at the moment is to try to fill in the gaps in Django’s documentation, so…

Over the next couple of entries we’re going to walk through a very simple form, which will submit via AJAX to a Django view and handle the result without a page refresh. If ...

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Helpers, scaffolding, tradeoffs and other stuff

In one of the very, very few coherent things I’ve seen him say in comments posted here and elsewhere, one Lucas Carlson brought up the other perceived advantage of JavaScript helpers: they save time:

Sure it is possible to add javascript helper functions to Django, and yes that would speed up initial development times and reduce bugs since Python is usually more terse than JS… even for expert JS programmers.

I’m going to ignore the “fewer bugs” argument because it seems to me that writing code in one ...

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JavaScript, ORM and “hiding SQL

So my little rant on AJAX support in Django apparently touched a nerve with a couple people; that means it’s time to write more about it.

One of the common points people have been raising, in comments and elsewhere, is that I shouldn’t rail against “hiding JavaScript from the developer” when Django’s ORM already hides SQL from the developer; from the perspective of a server-side developer, SQL is just as important, right?

Yes, SQL is just as important. But having ORM isn’t “hiding SQL”.

What ORM ...

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Django and AJAX

One hot topic that keeps coming up over and over again on the Django mailing lists and in IRC has to do with when Django will get “AJAX support”. There are two answers to that question; one can be stated with authority, and the other consists entirely of my own unofficial and non-binding opinion. Let’s start with the first:

We’ve already got it, and more is on the way

Doing AJAX with Django has always been pretty easy, though maybe in a way that’s not obvious to ...

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The Google Web Toolkit

So Google went and released something that people are calling an “AJAX toolkit” and, as so often happens whenever Google does something, the Internets are buzzing. But, in the long run, I don’t think this is going to be a game-changing move, and I think that should be pretty obvious to anyone who sits down and thinks about it.

The first question to ask about Google Web Toolkit is simple: who is it useful for? Obviously it’s useful for Google, but it looks an awful lot like it ...

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