Entries published in July 2009

4 entries published in this month. See also: all entries published in 2009, latest entries.

On “magic”, once again

So it seems Giles Bowkett is upset about use of the word “magic”. I’m happy to agree with the general consensus from various fora that the specific article he’s complaining about is, well, pretty much content-free. I could read that post over and over and still have no idea what actual things the author liked about Django or didn’t like about Rails. But I’ve pretty much learned to ignore content-free hype, and that’s what I did in that case.

I’m also quite happy to grant that not all programming languages do ...

Entry published July 23, 2009. Read full entry.

When licenses attack

Jacob posted twenty questions about the GPL. Zed followed with an explanation of why he placed Lamson under the GPL. This has provoked some discussion around the internets, some of which I have read and some of which I’ve ignored.

Unfortunately, there’s a lot of noise drowning out useful discussion, much of it centered around alleging — directly or indirectly — that if you ask questions about how the GPL interacts with other licenses, you must be trying to “get around” the GPL, or take someone’s GPL code and use it ...

Entry published July 14, 2009. Read full entry.

In pace requiescat

So the charter of the XHTML Working Group will be allowed to expire without renewal. This is a source of consternation for some, who feel that the W3C is perhaps sending conflicting messages — how long until we find out that HTML5 isn’t really the future, either? — and, perhaps, smug “I told you so” satisfaction for others.

I have little to add to either of those camps, so what follows here is nothing more than my rambling, disconnected thoughts on the news.

XHTML had it coming

In a way I ...

Entry published July 8, 2009. Read full entry.

An update on the book

So, the repository for the second edition of Practical Django Projects is not yet done, but due to the general clamor I’m opening up public access; you can browse it, or check out a copy of the code, from its page on Bitbucket. You’ll probably want to have a look over the README file displayed on that page, since it provides helpful information on how the repository works.

Right now the first three chapters’ worth of code (covering the first project in the book — a very simple content-management system) are ...

Entry published July 7, 2009. Read full entry.