Kick me

Published: June 7, 2008. Filed under: Django, Meta.

On a recent plane ride, I was watching an episode of The West Wing which had flashbacks to the original campaign which set up the Presidency on which the show is based. There’s a scene in that episode where Abbey Bartlet — the eventual First Lady on the show — is talking to some of her husband’s campaign staffers about whether her husband is ready to really run the campaign and be President. The dialogue is classic:

JOSH: Well, is he going to be ready?
ABBEY: You bet your ass he will. In the meantime, you want to kick something? Kick me.

If you don’t think Django releases come often enough, or that there’s something desperately wrong with the release system, or that Django isn’t ready for 1.0 or won’t be or, basically, have any concerns of the sort: please don’t post uninformed blog entries attacking the dev team. Please don’t try to “helpfully nudge” them out of concern for the project. They know what they’re doing, they know what needs to be done and they’re getting it done.

Come yell at me instead and get it out of your system. I’m the release manager, which mostly means I do behind-the-scenes bureaucracy, but I’ll be happy to listen to you and take the time to talk things through if that’s what you want. I’ll also be happy to just sit and let you yell at me, if that’s all you want to do.

The list of necessary things to happen before 1.0 is out in public, because Django has a transparent development process; you can see what’s happening as it happens. The reason why there hasn’t been an interim pre-1.0 release is also out in public, for the same reasons. If you’re concerned or curious about Django development, the information’s all out there, so you can do as much or as little due diligence as you’d like. And if you’ve got the time and the energy, consider pitching in and helping with bugfixes or with the work on major changes like newforms-admin.

Django 1.0 will happen and it will rock. In the meantime, you want to kick something? Kick me.