Entries published in February 2007

6 entries published in this month. See also: all entries published in 2007, latest entries.

Django snippets

Just in case you’re not subscribed to the Django mailing lists and/or aren’t at PyCon, today I launched a little side project I’ve been working on: djangosnippets.org, a site for Django users to share useful bits of code.

There are still a few things I’m working out (like feeds), but on the whole I’m pretty happy with it :)

Entry published February 25, 2007. Read full entry.

PyCon 2007: Web frameworks panel

(this was liveblogged during the panel, and the only later edits were to correct a couple of typos and add this notice — the content has not been changed)

Titus, the moderator, has welcomed everyone. No blood shed so far. Probably not taking audience questions.

Introduction of the panelists:

Titus pauses: “The most interesting thing about Django is, it’s what Guido would do.”

Titus says he’ll spark discussion by targeting Zope. First question: there’s a wide ...

Entry published February 23, 2007. Read full entry.

PyCon 2007: the prelude

So, I’m in Dallas, eagerly awaiting the beginning of the non-tutorial bits of PyCon 2007; I got here around 4:15PM (after a lovely flight where I was inadvertently bumped to first-class), and already things are rocking; I just got back from dinner and drinks with some folks who are doing really cool stuff with and to Django. Already got some interesting ideas and things to continue fleshing out, and I’ve got another four days to spend here.

If anyone’s looking for me, I’m lounging in my room in the Courtyard ...

Entry published February 22, 2007. Read full entry.

About model subclassing…

In Django 0.90 and 0.91 we offered the ability to subcless models, and a nasty hack called replaces_module which would let you tell Django to use a subclass in place of the original model it was inheriting from. The magic-removal changes broke that ability, and we’ve been slowly working toward getting it back (well, actually Malcolm has been rolling the Sysiphean rock up the hill and the rest of us have mostly been urging him on). I’d say it’s probably tied with automated database migrations as the feature ...

Entry published February 20, 2007. Read full entry.

Python framework design

Lately I’ve found myself being baited into the same old debate over and over and over again, and I’m getting tired of making the same arguments each time. Usually it begins with someone lamenting how Django is anti-community or too inflexible or generally suffering from a raging case of NIH. From there it progresses into people proclaiming how TurboGears or (more often) Pylons is objectively “better” because of how they’re designed, and how it would be nice for Django to follow their lead.

Before I go any further, I’d like you ...

Entry published February 19, 2007. Read full entry.

The JavaScript knowledge gap

JavaScript is a paradox of a language. It has nearly universal availability in its target market — client-side Web scripting — and is a major component of “Web 2.0”, but very few people actually write or even really know JavaScript. Many “modern” web-development frameworks remove the need for that by offering direct translation from some other language to JS, or by offering “helpers” which generate and include JavaScript automatically. And even among the few folks who don’t use those tools, most prefer to work entirely within the confines of ...

Entry published February 16, 2007. Read full entry.